Sneak Off and Read: Lines about KINDNESS, #RSsos #RomSuspense

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#OneLineSunday by #RSsos Lines about KINDNESS for a great start to the week. Enjoy!


The build. The blond hair. Those blue eyes. Kind to the people in this town, to his family. She wasn’t the right person for him.

Marsha West


Sharon WrayAlthough their family names intertwined with hers in every bible on the Isle, none of them had ever offered her a moment of kindness during her poverty-stricken childhood, after Rafe disappeared, or the night her father died.

Sharon Wray
When Next We Meet (work in progress)


“What kind of doctor are you? Her foot isn’t there. What did those idiot anatomy professors teach you?”

Vicki Batman
Raving Beauty” from Just You and Me set


She remembered her mom telling her, “Kindness is one of God’s greatest gifts, but it’s meant to be shared.” Cass liked that.

Jacquie Biggar


She appreciated his kindness, his gentleness, his emotional sincerity and honesty

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Dealing with Dialogue Tags

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Glancing back at some of my earlier work, I cringe at my use of “said bookisms” such as roared, admonished, exclaimed, queried, and hissed. I was trying to avoid overusing the word “said” and searched for suitable alternatives. I realize now that substituting those words made it sound like I enjoyed using my thesaurus. Instead, I was annoying the reader and drawing attention away from the dialogue.

From different workshop facilitators, I’ve learned that I don’t have to interpret the dialogue, or worse, tell the reader how the words are said. If the dialogue is strong enough, “he said” and “she said” will do. Like other parts of speech—the, is, and, but—that are used several times on each page, “said” is invisible and allows the reader to concentrate on the action and dialogue.

To add variety, I insert action tags and internal dialogue within blocks of dialogue.

Here’s an example…

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Falling in #Love with your #Characters #amwriting @jacqbiggar

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Readers often ask where do writers come up with ideas for their characters? In my case, the birth of a hero comes from a variety of sources. News reports, television programs, books I’ve read; all are great resources.

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But my favorite characters grow organically from stories I’ve already written. For my new release, Missing: The Lady Said No, the idea for my hero, Augustus Grant, came to me from a previous book where the main character was a mystery writer suffering from writer’s block.

Gus is the character my hero, Joel Carpenter, (in the holiday romance novelSilver Bells) was writing about. I fell in love with the bumbling detective and decided then and there he needed his own story!

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Gus is smart, irreverent, a little bit clumsy (okay, a LOT clumsy!) and still in love with the girl he let get away.

Rebecca Hayes.

Here’s a short…

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Sneak Off and Read: Lines about HOPE, #RSsos #RomSuspense

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sisterhood of suspense

#OneLineSunday by #RSsos Lines about HOPE for a great start to the week. Enjoy!


I just needed to dig deep, finish the adventure, and hope that I would be stronger in the end.

S.A. Taylor
Follow Me (work in progress)


What if her fan was one of those nut cases who hurt the object of their affections when they realize their case is hopeless?

Marsha West


Sharon WrayHe wasn’t just a bastard. He wasn’t just a fool. He just wasn’t the man he’d once hoped to become.

Sharon Wray
When Next We Meet (work in progress)


He looked…magnificent. His eyes gleamed with hopes and dreams.

Vicki Batman
Raving Beauty” from Just You and Me set


Becky stilled, and gazed up at him with so much hope and doubt and disbelief, his heart cracked.

Jacquie Biggar
Hold ‘Em- Luck of the Draw Box Set


He doesn’t understand everything that drives him and…

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The Long & The Short Of It.

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What are we talking about? Hair. Mine, yours, and our characters.

I think I’ve mentioned here before that I don’t like change. Any kind of change. I wore my hair the same way for over twenty years. My daughters kept telling me I should change. (Both are much more okay with change than I am.) I didn’t believe them until I went through some photo albums for a project for my husband. OMG! They were right. I was a curly headed blonde for over twenty years. I got perms and had it highlighted—expensive, but I felt like I looked good pretty much all the time and I didn’t have to do too much too it. Definite benefit. If it’s not broken, don’t fix it is my moto.photo(55) Very, very highlighted blond on wedding day. (We’ve both improved with age. :))

Hair says a lot about us. I was busy…

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Sneak Off and Read: Lines about BIRDS, #RSsos #RomSuspense

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#OneLineSunday by #RSsos Lines about BIRDS for a great start to the week. Enjoy!


Miller had a suspicion Laura had been hurt, badly, sometime in her past. She was jumpy and panicky, like a frightened bird, trapped and uncertain what to do next.

Claire Gem


Then there was playtime, exploring, and sometimes they went out on the screened porch where they’d snuggle in a big chair and watch the sun push night aside, while they listened to the birds sing in celebration of a new day.

Kathryn Jane


Sunlight filtered in between the canopy of tree branches, birds chirped, and strains of Etta James and the Righteous Brothers spilled over from the reception area.

S.A. Taylor
Shutter (work in progress)


They’d eaten their dinner on the terrace where a breeze rippled the surface, and the water lapped against the dock. Sea birds landed on the dock and then lurched away.

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Getting to Know My Cast

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Happy Friday! What better day than this to share some writing inspiration—and perhaps inspire us to make use of some the weekend to further our works-in-progress.racehorse-152697_640

I would have made a bad racehorse. My writing on a new project tends to start out like hellfire: I get a fabulous idea, a great premise for a story, and there I go—bang!—out of the starting gate with all the speed of Affirmed or American Pharaoh. I’m banging away at the keys in a fevered frenzy, the first ten thousand words or so flowing out of my imagination with effortless exuberance.

But then I get to page fifty or so. My burst of writing energy gets winded. And just like a racehorse who leads the pack until he reaches the first turn, I find, sadly, I’m out of gas.

Why does this happen to me? Because although I began with a great story premise

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